Festival Of Maharashtra

 

 

 

 

Maharashtra is a land of rich cultural heritage and traditions. The diverse form of landscape and environment make the state's culture more colourful. Maharashtrians celebrate every fair with great fervour and enthusiasm. The sacred Kumb Mela at Nashik that comes after every twelve years is regarded to be the most important religious fair in Maharashtra.

As Maharashtrians have great belief of Lord Ganesh, Ganesh Utsav at Sangli and Pune are the fairs that Maharashtrians celebrate with great fun fare, which are attended by the maximum number of visitors even from foreign countries. The Maharashtra government in collaboration with the Union government is promoting the Pune fair as a major tourists attraction.

Other important temple fairs include Changdeo fair at the Markandeya Temple near Edlabad, Kiran Utsav at the Mahalaxmi Temple at Kolhapur, Rathyatra at the Kalaram Temple in Nashik, and the Shrirama Rathotsava fair and the Navaratra Mahalaxmi fair at the Navaratra Mahalaxmi temple in Jalgaon.

The Khuldabad Urs is a festival for Muslims; celebrated for five days. Mount Mary Festival, which is held every year at Bandra, Mumbai attracts huge crowds of the city. The Snake festival at Battis Shirala town too attracts large number of tourists from India and aboard.
Wat Pournima is the festival for Maharashtrian women, which is celebrated in the month of Jesht (May-June). Women observe a fast and tie threads around a banyan tree and pray for the same husband in every birth.

The celebration derived from the story of Savitri and Satyavan. It has been foretold that Satyavan won't live long. Resting on the lap of Savitri, Satyavan was waiting for death under a banyan tree, when the day of death comes. The messenger of Yama, the God of death came to take Satyavan. But Savitri refused to give her beloved husband. Messenger after messenger tried to take Satyavan away, but in vain. Finally, Yama himself appeared in front of Savitri and insisted to give her husband.

Since, she was still adamant, he offered her a boon. She asked for the well being of her in-laws. He granted it to her. She then followed him as he took Satyavan's body away. He offered her another boon. She now asked for the well being of her parents. This boon, too, was granted. But she was relentless, and continued to follow him. As they approached Yama's abode, he offered her a final boon. She asked for a son. He granted it. She then asked him how it would be possible for her to beget sons without her husband. Yama was trapped and had to return her husband.



Buddha Purnima is the most sacred day in the Buddhist calendar. It is the most important festival of the Buddhists, and is celebrated with great enthusiasm. Although Buddhists regard every full moon as sacred, the moon of the month of Vaisakh (April - May) has special significance because on this day the Buddha was born, attained enlightenment, and attained Nirvana when he died. This strange, three - fold coincidence, gives Buddha Purnima its unique significance.
Whereas followers of others religions observe the births, deaths, and other important occasions in the lives of their founders, for Buddhists all these events are combined in one on the full moon day in Vaisakh. On this day they baths and wear only white clothes. They gather in their viharas for worship and give alms to monks. Many spend their entire day at the vihara listening to discourses on the life and teaching of the Buddha or invite monks to their homes to speak to them. They reaffirm their faith in the five principles (Panch Sheel) - not to take life, not to steal, not to die, not to imbibe liquor or other intoxicants and not to commit adultery.
On Buddha Purnima Buddhists refrain from eating meat and eat kheer which they share with the poor. They set up stalls in public places which provide clean drinking water. Their special forms of charity include kindness to animals : they buy caged birds and set them free and pay butchers to let go animals meant for slaughter.
Just as in some homes paper lanterns are hung on Diwali, on Buddha Purnima Buddhists make Vaisakh Vakats out of bamboo, festoon them with starts and decorate their houses with them. Some people also drape the walls of their homes with paper or cloth depicting incidents from the Jataka tales which are based on incarnations of the Buddha prior to his birth as Prince Gautama.



Dussehra and Diwali are celebrated in October and November.According to the great Hindu epic Ramayana, Dussehra is the day on which Lord Ram killed Ravan, the evil king of Lanka. It is considered as a shubh-muharat - a very auspicious day - to start a new venture. It is a symbol of the victory of good over evil. Tools of trade, vehicles and machinery are worshipped on this day. As the evening falls, the villagers cross the border, a ritual known as Simollanghan, and worship the Shami tree. The leaves of the Apta tree are collected and exchanged among friends and relatives as gold.
Diwali, which is the festival of lights, marks the end of one commercial year and the beginning of another. . Streets are illuminated with rows of clay lamps and homes are decorated with rangoli (coloured powder designs) and aakash kandils (decorative lanterns of different shapes and sizes). A unique Maharashtrian touch is seen in the akash kandeels or lanterns that are hung outside homes. People rise at dawn, massage their bodies with " utanh " a special type of scented oil and take a holy bath. Diwali is celebrated with new clothes, spectacular firecrackers and a variety of sweets in the company of family and friends. Dhanatrayodashi; Narakchaturdashi, Amavasya (Laxmi poojan), Balipratipada and Yamadvitiya (Bhaubeej) are the five days which comprise Diwali, and each day has a peculiar religious significance. Bhaubij, the last day of Diwali, is similar to Raksha Bandan and deals with the relationship between brother and sister



Ganesh Chaturthi Lord Ganesh, the patron deity of Maharashtra, is the God of wisdom. Come August, preparations to celebrate Ganesh Chaturthi - the auspicious day when Lord Ganesh was born - begin with great enthusiasm all over the state. Ganesh is the elephant headed son of Shiva and Parvathi. Ganesh is believed to be the harbinger of good luck who removes all obstacles to success. He brings prosperity and keeps natural calamities at bay in the lives of those who worship him. This ten-day festival begins with the installation of the deity, who is then worshipped daily till the immersion on the final day. Small Ganesh idols are installed in homes. Idols can tower 10m high and weigh several tones. On the tenth day, serpentine processions fill the streets and with the accompaniment of drumbeats and music the image of Ganesh is immersed in the water. Devotees chant 'Ganapati Bappa Morya' which means Ganesh, Daddy, please come back soon next year.

The Visarjan (immersion) Processions and Ceremony

The festival ends with the ceremony of immersion of the idols in the sea or rivers and wells.

This ceremony which is called Ganesha-Visarjan which means immersion of Ganesha is as popular as the festival proper. During the immersion ceremony huge crowds move in a procession carrying idols of Ganesha towards the places of immersion. These processions which take place with great fanfare, begins in the afternoon and continue till the late hours of the night.

Although this festival is observed in all parts of the country, it is celebrated with maximum fervour in Maharashtra where it is celebrated both publicly and privately. Apart from the small idols of Ganesha that are installed in various houses, there are also many public celebrations called Sarvajanik Ganeshotsava. The Public Celebrations of Ganesh-Chaturthi - Started by Lokmanya Tilak

In these public celebrations huge images of Ganesha ranging from 10 feet to 40 feet are installed and alongwith the daily prayers and hymns, there are entertainment programmes which are a major attraction. Till the turn of the last century, this festival was celebrated only in homes and temples. But during the struggle for independence against British rule, Lokmanya Tilak (an important freedom fighter who led the Indian freedom struggle before Mahatma Gandhi took over) gave it the form of a public festival. Tilak did this so as to cleverly broadcast his political message of freedom for India.

Carried out in the garb of a religious activity, it was difficult for the British Administration to curb it. But the festival once having acquired a public form for a political purpose, retained that form even after the political purpose did not exist. Hence even today in independent India Ganeshotsava is celebrated both publicly and privately.



Gokul Ashtami is celebrated in August - The birth of Lord Krishna. Most devotees fast till midnight and when the birth of Lord Krishna is announced, they eat a festive preparation of rice, butter, yogurt, puris and potatoes. This meal, according to Hindu mythology, was relished by Lord Krishna and his playmates in Gokul. Young men form human pyramids to break pots of curds strung high up from buildings. In the villages, the Pola or the harvest festival is celebrated in which bullocks are bathed, decorated and taken out in a procession to the accompaniment of beating drums.
The Ceremony of Dahi-Handi
During this ceremony a large earthenware pot is filled with milk, curds, butter, honey fruits etc. and is suspended from a height between 20 to 40 feet. Sporting young men and boys come forward to claim this prize. To do so they construct a human pyramid by standing over each other's shoulders till the pyramid is tall enough to enable the topmost person to reach the pot and claim the contents after breaking it. Normally, currency notes are tied to the rope by which the pot is suspended. This prize money is distributed among those who participate in the pyramid building.



Gudhi Padwa (March/April) is the most significant for it marks the start of the Maharashtrian New Year. It is dedicated to Sahaliwan, the son of a humble potter who overthrew the reigning Guptas of Malwa to become an important monarch guiding the fortunes of a new dynasty. This day marks the start of the Hindu solar year. On this day people offer rituals, prayers, prasad of neem leaves, gram pulse and jagerry and they buy new clothes. Families erect a gudhi or bamboo staff, with a colored silk cloth and a bright garlanded goblet is hung on top of it, which symbolizes victory or achievement. In a city where business is conducted as much through modern technology as ancient wisdom, the advice of astrologers on this day is highly sought.



Changdeo in Maharashtra is regarded to be a holy place because of Purna and Tapi rivers. People flock here once a year to take a holy dip. It is also a place where saint Markandeya is believed to have practiced penance.

The place is about 6 km away from Edlabad. A fair, which is attended by nearly 80,000 pilgrims, is held at this place during the month of Magha (January-February) every year. These pilgrims are mostly from the Vidarbha region of Maharashtra.

Nearest airport is at Nagpur at a distance of 177 km from Changdeo; nearest railway station is however at Chandrapur, which is 91 km away. The shortest route to Changdeo by road is via Milswali-Sakhri route, which is about 183 km. Hotels are available at Gadchiroli.



Kala Ghoda Festival is held on Sundays between November and January months near Jehangir Art Gallery at Mumbai. Kala Ghoda Festival is a celebration of arts and crafts that brings together the works of artistes in the fields of music, dance, theatre and film. It offers an interactive cultural concoction for Mumbaites.

Kala Ghoda Festival is organized by the Kala Ghoda Association, which was established in 1988, with the aim of improving the existing infrastructure of the area, and giving it a distinct identity as Mumbai's art district. The Kala Ghoda festival is also a medium for the revival of arts across Mumbai.

The entire area is decorated into a pedestrian plaza. Portrait paintings, traditional mehendi, exotic bangles, cuisine and traditional Parsi breakfast are the main attractions of this festival. Folk dancers, musicians and singers entertain the gathering.

Timings: 10.00 am to 9.00 pm
Cultural show and Cuisine: 5.00 pm onwards.
Parsi Breakfast: 10.00 am to 11.00 am
Films: 2.00 pm to 4.00 pm.



Khulabad is a place situated at a distance of 5 km from the Ellora caves and 22 km from Aurangabad on the Aurangabad-Ellora route. This place is also known as the 'valley of saints' because of huge presence of Sufi saints. They were migrated to this place hundreds years back.


Khuldabad is a holy shrine for Muslims. It has a tomb built by the last Mughal emperor, Aurangazeb. Khulabad Urs festival, which celebrates here for five days, is a very popular fair that attracts a large number of devotees.

Nearest railway station and airport is at Aurangabad. This place is well connected by road as well. Bus and taxi services from Aurangabad to Khuldabad are very good. One can stay at the hotels in Aurangabad.



Kiran Utsav is one of the popular festivals in India. It is organized at Mahalaxmi Temple of Kolhapur district in Maharashtra on 31st January, 1st February, and 9th, 10th, and 11th November every year. Goddess Laxmi is worshipped during this festival.


The Mahalaxmi Temple is elegantly decorated for this festival. Millions of pilgrims throng to Kolhapur to take part in this festival from all over India. One can witness the amazing architecture of the Mahalaxmi Temple, which had been built in a way that the rays of the setting sun coming through a window touches the Goddess's feet before it vanishes.

Kolhapur is well connected by air, rail and road with the important places within and beyond the state. Numbers of hotels are available in Kolhapur for accommodation.



Kiran Utsav is one of the popular festivals in India. It is organized at Mahalaxmi Temple of Kolhapur district in Maharashtra on 31st January, 1st February, and 9th, 10th, and 11th November every year. Goddess Laxmi is worshipped during this festival.


The Mahalaxmi Temple is elegantly decorated for this festival. Millions of pilgrims throng to Kolhapur to take part in this festival from all over India. One can witness the amazing architecture of the Mahalaxmi Temple, which had been built in a way that the rays of the setting sun coming through a window touches the Goddess's feet before it vanishes.

Kolhapur is well connected by air, rail and road with the important places within and beyond the state. Numbers of hotels are available in Kolhapur for accommodation.



Mount Mary's Festival is celebrated for one week during September at Mount Mary Church, Bandra in the suburbs of Mumbai, Maharashtra. This fair, which is also popularly known as the Bandra fair is celebrated on the occasion of Mother Mary's birthday.

Lakhs of people of different religions and communities flock to this place during the festival. Marathi speaking communities of Maharashtra refer Mother Mary as Math Mauli. It is a belief of the local people that Mount Mary fulfils their genuine wishes if prayers are made earnestly and faithfully.

It is magnificent to take a look of the Arabian Sea from the site of the church. Mumbai is well connected by road, train and air with any part of India. Accommodations are available at the hotels Bandra as well.



Pune festival is held between August and September during Ganesh Mahotsav. It is the biggest festival of Pune. The festival goes for ten days - starts with the installation of idols of Lord on the first day to immersion of the Lord's idols on the tenth day.

Pune festival is mainly emphasized on the celebration of art and culture, song and dance, custom and tradition. It was started as a local event but now has succeeded to attract visitors from across India and abroad. The Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation joining hand with the Union government actively promotes the festival abroad as a major tourist attraction.

Classical dance, music recitals, film, drama festival, automobile rallies and traditional sports are held as a part of the festival. Maestros and stalwarts from all over India are invited to perform during the festival. The denizens of Pune and also the visitors from outside enjoy the event with fullest during the celebrations.

Modern sport events, shop for exquisite textiles and handicrafts, appetizing cuisine are some of the new additions since past few years.

Pune is well connected by air, rail and road with the important places within and beyond the state. Accommodations are available at the hotels in Pune.



A festival called Janmotsava is celebrated at Sansthan Shri Kalaram Mandir, Panchavati, Nashik every year. The festival, which spans 15 days begin from the first day of Chaitra till Chaitra Purnima. The Janmotsava, which is witnessed by thousands of pilgrims takes place exactly at 12 noon.


The main attraction of the festival is the rathyatra that takes place on the second day, in which Shri Ram rath and Garuda rath moves through the Nashik city. The Rathyatra starts at about 4.30 p.m. The Rathyatra is made up of 5 links, 1st is the bullock cart of Sanai / Choughada, followed by the Palkhi of Shri Ramachandra, Pujadhikari, Garudarath (the rath of Lord Hanuman) and finally the Ramrath (the rath of Lord Rama).

The pujadhikari walks with the rath all the way it is moving by facing towards the rath with folded hands. He maintains fasting, which starts from day one of the Chaitra to the Rathyatra. Both the raths are pulled by the rath sevakas with using heavy rope.

Nashik is well connected by road, air and train with rest of India. Hotels are available in Nashik.

i�� ea�� йels in Pune.

 

nt�� *�� й0.9 StartHTML:0000000211 EndHTML:0000007042 StartFragment:0000000247 EndFragment:0000007006 SourceURL:http://localhost/mah/administrator/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&layout=edit&id=71 Pune festival is held between August and September during Ganesh Mahotsav. It is the biggest festival of Pune. The festival goes for ten days - starts with the installation of idols of Lord on the first day to immersion of the Lord's idols on the tenth day.

Pune festival is mainly emphasized on the celebration of art and culture, song and dance, custom and tradition. It was started as a local event but now has succeeded to attract visitors from across India and abroad. The Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation joining hand with the Union government actively promotes the festival abroad as a major tourist attraction.

Classical dance, music recitals, film, drama festival, automobile rallies and traditional sports are held as a part of the festival. Maestros and stalwarts from all over India are invited to perform during the festival. The denizens of Pune and also the visitors from outside enjoy the event with fullest during the celebrations.

Modern sport events, shop for exquisite textiles and handicrafts, appetizing cuisine are some of the new additions since past few years.

Pune is well connected by air, rail and road with the important places within and beyond the state. Accommodations are available at the hotels in Pune.



Banganga Festival held every year in the city of Mumbai is a musical tribute to Lord Ram. The aim behind the celebration of this musical carnival is to protect the existing rich heritage. According to the legend Lord Ram had stayed here for some time on his return from Lanka after winning over Ravan. The natives were probably Shaivites and worshiped Shivalinga (Phallus stone). When Ram happened to visit the place locals asked him for water to perform bath ritual for Shivalinga. Lord Ram shot an arrow (Bana) and water profuse from holy Ganges itself.


The major attraction is ringing bells of temple along with praising songs for God. The whole affair gives nostalgia. These songs composed by unknown poets through the ages have become part of local culture and are integral part of temple rituals performed everyday. ‘The same heritage should be protected’ is the idea behind the organizing the Banganga Festival. The main organizer Indian Heritage Society Mumbai and MTDC want to foster the thought of protection of heritage among people.

This two-day musical carnival enlivens the city of Mumbai. The city comes into its true spirit and versatility. People visit temples varying from different class and caste. Volunteers to offer glittering look decorate Temples all over the city. Music, chants, and praising songs of God become popular in these two days. Though started in the year 1992, the festival in these two days makes Mumbai more attractive to tourists.



Elephanta Festival is another festival for dance and music organised by the Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation (MTDC). It is organised in the month of February. Renowned dancers and musicians perform outside the caves of Elephanta under the starry sky in front of the selected and appreciative audience. Special launch services and catering arrangements are also provided for visitors.


A boat ride from the Gateway of India in Mumbai to the Elephanta Islands is also included as a part of the festival. Elephanta is just one-and-a-half hours drive away from Mumbai. The island was once known as Puri or Gharapuri. Portuguese found a monolithic stone elephant at this place so as named derived 'Elephanta'.



Ellora festival is the festival of classical dance and music organised under the backdrop of the Ellora caves. This festival, which is organised by Maharashtra Tourism Development Corporation (MTDC) in the month of March showcases the best talents from across the country in the field of classical music and dance.


Experiencing such a magnificent performance on the backdrop of the 1,400-year old caves and rock carvings would be a lifetime experience. Ellora caves displays the sculptural and architectural splendours. The Kailasa Temple, which is an asset to not only to the state of Maharashtra but also to India because of its sculptured expertise is at Ellora caves. This temple is carved out of one huge rock, is one of the most beautiful backdrops for an event such as this.



Kojagiri Poornima or Ashwin Poornima is celebrated on the full moon day of Ashwin (September-October). As the rainy season passes, the sky becomes clear and the moon shines in the sky with full brightness. So, it is the celebration of this occasion, which is very traditional. It is also known as the Kaumudi, meaning moonlight.


Goddess Laxmi is worshipped on this day. People keep awake the whole night singing songs or other entertaining things. Because Maharashtrians believe that Goddess Laxmi moves around from place to place asking, 'Who is awake?' (Kojagarti?). She shows her on those she finds awake. People take only fluids like coconut water and milk. Milk masala, a readymade combination of dry fruits and milk is taken on the day.



Maharashtra attained statehood on 1st May 1960. So, the day is organized as Maharashtra Day in Maharashtra. The state government organizes the main function in Mumbai. Maharashtra Day is held at Shivaji Park in central Mumbai. The governor of the state takes the salute at the ceremonial parade, comprising members of the state reserve police force, Brihanmumbai Commando Force, home guards, civil defence, fire brigade and city police.



Shivaji Maharaj was the greatest ruler of Maharashtra. So, Maharashtrians have a great regard for this Maratha ruler. To give a respect, the birthday of Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj is celebrated on huge scale on February 19th every year. He was born on this day at the Shivneri fort in the year 1630. He is known as the creator of the Maratha nation.


Shivaji had great mind of constructive genius of medieval India. Time may change, empires may go and dynasties may become faded, but the greatness of Shivaji is alive in the minds of Maharashtrian in particular and in the minds of every India in general. His dazzling victories and ever-ready smile made him the idol of his soldiers.



Wat Pournima is the festival for Maharashtrian women, which is celebrated in the month of Jesht (May-June). Women observe a fast and tie threads around a banyan tree and pray for the same husband in every birth.


The celebration derived from the story of Savitri and Satyavan. It has been foretold that Satyavan won't live long. Resting on the lap of Savitri, Satyavan was waiting for death under a banyan tree, when the day of death comes. The messenger of Yama, the God of death came to take Satyavan. But Savitri refused to give her beloved husband. Messenger after messenger tried to take Satyavan away, but in vain. Finally, Yama himself appeared in front of Savitri and insisted to give her husband.

Since, she was still adamant, he offered her a boon. She asked for the well being of her in-laws. He granted it to her. She then followed him as he took Satyavan's body away. He offered her another boon. She now asked for the well being of her parents. This boon, too, was granted. But she was relentless, and continued to follow him. As they approached Yama's abode, he offered her a final boon. She asked for a son. He granted it. She then asked him how it would be possible for her to beget sons without her husband. Yama was trapped and had to return her husband.



some more text here and so on...



some more text here and so on...



some more text here and so on...



some more text here and so on...



some more text here and so on...

 

 

 

Slider Title 1

Your text...

Slider Title 2

Your text...


Slider Title 3

Your text...


Slider Title 4

Your text...


Slider Title 5

Your text...


Slider Title 6

Your text...


Slider Title 7

Your text...